PARENTS

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Welcome Parents!

Whether you are a parent to an American Indian student, or a parent trying to learn more about American Indians in order to help your non-Native student, we hope you will find these resources helpful. Our aim is to share accurate, respectful information about American Indians with all families. You will find a wealth of information both about Indian tribes in a historical context and also to bring the thriving contemporary Indian world to your students in order to present a balanced view and bring things up to date in your students’ minds. We hope that you find these resources useful and pass them along.


*Throughout these resources, these collective terms may be used interchangeably to refer to the indigenous populations of the United States: American Indian, Indian, Native American, Native, First Nations, First People, indigenous.

-- North Carolina State Advisory Council on Indian Education


North Carolina’s Eight State-Recognized Tribes

North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs Tribal Listing

First People downloadable brochure

Map of NC Tribal Communities


Contemporary Websites and Publications

American Indians in Children’s Literature: This outstanding blog has great book reviews and commentaries that help teachers and others evaluate books from a Native perspective. Highly recommended to browse this site before using literature in class that includes American Indians.

American Indian magazine

Indian 101 for Writers: This five-part blog series, appropriate for both writers, parents and teachers looks at writing (and teaching) about American Indians and gives resources to accurately and respectfully do so.

Indian Country Today Media Network: Indian Country Today is Indian Country’s online news that gives information on top issues in Indian culture today. It is helpful to anyone teaching or learning about First Peoples to be aware of contemporary Indian issues.

Native Appropriations:
Native Appropriations is a forum for discussing representation of Native peoples, including stereotypes, cultural appropriation, news, activism and more.

Native Peoples magazine


Alphabetical Listing of Online Resources

American Indians in Children’s Literature:
This outstanding blog has great book reviews and commentaries that help parents and teachers see and evaluate books from a Native point of view. Highly recommended to browse this site before providing students with books that include American Indians.

Common Core State Standards:
Helpful information, resources and videos about the Common Core State Standards. To read the standards, go to Explore the Common Core, Read the Standards.

Criteria From How To Tell the Difference: A Guide for Evaluating Children’s Books for Anti-Indian Bias (adapted from oyate.org):
This helpful document gives tips and thinking points to help you learn to evaluate books for bias and stereotypes.
(pdf, 202kb)

Indian 101 for Writers:  
This five-part blog series, appropriate for both writers, parents and teachers looks at writing (and teaching) about American Indians and gives resources to accurately and respectfully do so.

Indian Country Today Media Network:
Indian Country Today is Indian Country’s online news that gives information on top issues in Indian culture today. It is helpful to anyone teaching or learning about First Peoples to be aware of contemporary Indian issues.

Learn NC American Indian Resources:
Learn NC has assembled lesson plans, articles and great websites to help you teach to, and about, America’s First People. *Largely geared toward historical information; teachers and parents will need to supplement with contemporary information.

Learn NC/UNC American Indian Center’s Curriculum Guide,Teaching About North Carolina American Indians:
This curriculum guide has tribally-supplied information, useful K-16, that includes great contemporary, as well as historical, information from all eight of North Carolina’s state-recognized tribes. Lesson plans included with some of the tribes.

Museum of the Cherokee Indian:
The Museum’s Education & Outreach offers courses and workshops for teachers, students and families as well as literature and other resources.. Their goal is to provide accurate information about the Cherokee.

National Museum of the American Indian:
Located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., this museum is dedicated to the preservation, study and exhibition of the life, language, literature, contemporary accuracy, history and arts of American Indians.

Native American Resource Center:
The mission of the Native American Resource Center of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is to educate the public about the prehistory, history, culture, art and contemporary issues of American Indians, with special emphasis on the Robeson County Native American community; to conduct scholarly research; to collect and preserve the material culture of Native America; to encourage Native American artists and craftspersons; and to cooperate on a wide range of projects with other agencies concerned with Native America. The museum of the Native American Resource Center contains exhibits of authentic Indian artifacts, arts and crafts. These items come from Indian people all over North America, from Abenaki to Zuni. Many other items come from North Carolina Native Americans, with particular focus on the Lumbee tribe of North Carolina.

North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs:
Created in 1971 by the North Carolina General Assembly, the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs has a two-fold mission to increase economic opportunities for Indians in North Carolina and to maximize educational opportunities for Indian citizens of North Carolina. The NCCIA also offers links to resources on Indian education and initiatives.

The North Carolina Museum of History holds an annual American Indian Heritage Celebration in November. This is a wonderful, free event for the public with all eight North Carolina state-recognized tribes represented and much information, hands-on activities and events. There is also a ‘student day’.

North Carolina State Advisory Council on Indian Education

The State Advisory Council on Indian Education was established to identify issues and concerns that affect academic achievement of American Indian students. Council members study the yearly data collected on academic achievement and dropout rates, keep abreast of education policy issues at the local, state, and national levels, and work with tribal leadership in American Indian communities. As an outcome, the Council produces an annual report that addresses relevant concerns pertaining to the education of American Indian students and provides recommendations to the North Carolina State Board of Education.

Oyate:
Oyate is a Native organization working to see that Native lives and histories are portrayed with honesty and integrity. They have an online bookstore with appropriate materials and offer book reviews. Under their Resources tab, please especially see their sections on Thanksgiving and evaluating books for anti-Indian bias. And don’t miss the Living Stories section under Resources!

Resources for Projects on American Indians:
This page of the blog American Indians in Children’s Literature lists specific suggested texts. The NC SACIE would also suggest that you use the numerous other resources listed on our page to familiarize yourself with accurate vs stereotypical resources.

UNC American Indian Center:
The American Indian Center at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill is a campus-wide center to advance the University’s overall mission of research, teaching and public service by creating an environment in which quality research, scholarship, and engagement related to American Indians is strengthened, nurtured and coordinated. North Carolina is home to one of the largest Native populations in the Eastern United States and the center serves as the University’s front door to American Indian communities across the state and nation. The center enables Carolina to truly serve the First People of North Carolina.


For more information, contact sacie@dpi.nc.gov