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STANDARD COURSE OF STUDY

SOCIAL STUDIES :: 2006 :: AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES

AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES

American Indian Studies introduces students to the diverse history and culture of American Indians, beginning with life prior to Columbus. Important issues American Indians have faced from prehistoric societies to present-day contemporary society are discussed. Students immerse themselves in America's oldest and continuous civilizations and cultures with a focus on American Indians of North Carolina.

Strands: American Indian History; American Indian Culture; American Indian Contemporary Issues; Geographic Relationships; Culture, Time and Change; People, Place and Environments; Social Issues, Civic Ideals and Practices; Power, Authority and Governance

Competency Goal 1 The learner will examine American Indian life prior to the arrival of Columbus.
 

Objectives

1.01 Describe the Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, and Mississippian phases of American Indian prehistory.

1.02 Explain the technological changes which occurred during prehistory.

1.03 Describe the lifestyles of American Indians in prehistory such as subsistence, settlement patterns, and social organization.

1.04 Describe the adaptations of American Indians to local environments.

1.05 Identify how North Carolina fits in the larger prehistoric context, including regional studies of archaeological sites.

Competency Goal 2 The learner will analyze the historical developments that characterize Native American life in the period prior to the Civil War.
 

Objectives

2.01 Explain the effects of contact and conflict between American Indians and Europeans.

2.02 Assess the impact of exploration and colonization of the Americas by Spain, France, England, and other European powers.

2.03 Demonstrate an understanding of the impact on North Carolina tribes of the events of this period, such as the Tuscarora War and the disenfranchisement of the states' American Indians in 1835.

2.04 Assess the impact of the major events of the period including, but not limited to, the Iroquois Confederacy and the Great Law of Peace; the removal of American Indians from the East; and the participation of American Indians in the Civil War.

2.05 Describe colonial and federal treaty relationships with American Indians.

2.06 Identify the major American Indian leaders, male and female, of this period, and explain their significance in the development of U. S. history.

Competency Goal 3 The learner will analyze the historical developments that characterize Native American life in the period from the Civil War to the present.
 

Objectives

3.01 Describe the conflicts between American Indians and Europeans after the Civil War, with special focus on westward expansion and its effects on Indian land.

3.02 Identify and explain the major events of the period including, but not limited to, the Apache Wars, the Flight of the Nez Perce, the Long Walk of the Navajo, Custer's Defeat, Wounded Knee (1890), the Trail of Broken Treaties, the Occupation of Alcatraz, and the Seizure of Wounded Knee (1973).

3.03 Describe the federal policies, which impacted American Indians, such as forced assimilation, allotment, federal boarding schools, compensation termination, relocation, and tribal self-determination.

3.04 Describe the involvement of North Carolina tribes in the events of this period, including but not limited to the Lowrie War, the establishment of all-Indian schools in the state's tribal communities, and the establishment of the North Carolina Commission of Indian Affairs.

3.05 Identify the major American Indian leaders, male and female, of this period, and explain their significance to U. S. history.

Competency Goal 4 The learner will investigate the diversity of American Indian tribal cultures.
 

Objectives

4.01 Identify and describe significant characteristics of major cultural areas of North American Indians.

4.02 Compare and contrast American Indian language families, such as Iroquoian, Algonkian, and Siouan.

4.03 Demonstrate a general knowledge of American Indian art, music and spirituality, including the modern day powwow.

4.04 Explain the connection between American Indian kinship and family structures.

4.05 Compare the worldviews of American Indians and mainstream society, such as concept of time, relationship to the natural universe, and circularity versus linearity.

4.06 Describe the traditional and contemporary cultural characteristics of North Carolina tribes.

Competency Goal 5 The learner will analyze contemporary issues that face American Indians.
 

Objectives

5.01 Analyze the major socio-cultural issues of concern to American Indians, including cultural identity, stereotypes, and relations with non-Indians.

5.02 Analyze the major political issues of concern to American Indians including tribal sovereignty; land, water, hunting and fishing rights; and relationships with federal and state governments.

5.03 Explore the major issues of spirituality which concern American Indians including religious freedom, the Native American Church, protection of sacred sites, and repatriation.

5.04 Identify major health issues of concern to American Indians including, but not limited to, diabetes, hypertension, asthma, and substance abuse and analyze their impact on American Indians.

5.05 Discuss the contemporary issues that affect North Carolina Indian tribes.

 

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